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Traugott Bitter, Sr.

Traugott Bitter, Sr.[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

Male 1834 - 1929  (94 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name Traugott Bitter  [9
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born 2 Dec 1834  , Kreuzburg in Oberschlesien, Opolskiego, Preussen Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10
    Gender Male 
    Alt. Birth 2 Dec 1834  Königsberg, , , Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Immigration 1854  Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Pioneer 20 Sep 1861  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Name Trougott Bitter  [11
    Occupation
    • Carpenter on Salt Lake theater. Moved to St. George in 1862, to Logan in 1864, where he helped build the Logan temple and tabernacle.
    Occupation Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Residence Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 25 Jan 1929  Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 11
    Cause: Chronic Myocarditis, Arteriosclerosis 
    Buried 28 Jan 1929  Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 11
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I979  Full Tree | Larson, Bitter
    Last Modified 15 Feb 2016 

    Father Gotthardt Bitter
              b. 2 May 1803, , Schnakeinen, East Preussen, Preussen Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 20 Sep 1891, Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Mother Louise Neumann
              b. 19 Mar 1801, , Ramsen, Opr, Preussen Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 19 Mar 1866, , Ramsen, Opr, Preussen Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Married Abt 1822  , Schnakeinen, East Preussen, Preussen Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F688  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Wilhelmina Rosina Aust
              b. 6 Jun 1836, Ruda Slaska, , Katowice, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 26 May 1919, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 24 Sep 1859  Königsberg, , Ostpreussen, Preussen Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 13
    Traugott and Wilhelmina Bitter and family
    Children 
    +1. Martha Bitter
              b. 29 Aug 1860, New York, New York, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 12 Jun 1946, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     2. Traugott William Bitter, Jr.
              b. 28 Oct 1862, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 15 Oct 1863, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +3. Joseph Bitter, Sr.
              b. 23 Aug 1864, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 18 Jun 1967, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 102 years)
     4. Amelia Bitter
              b. 18 Nov 1866, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 17 Mar 1921  (Age 54 years)
     5. Albert Bitter
              b. 18 Nov 1868, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 27 Jul 1870, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     6. George Bitter
              b. 17 Jan 1871, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 22 Oct 1872, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     7. Richard Alfred Bitter
              b. 15 Jul 1873, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 17 Dec 1960, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
     8. Willard Rudolph Bitter
              b. 3 Mar 1876, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 5 Jan 1891, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 14 years)
    +9. Charles Bitter
              b. 5 Jan 1878, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 17 Feb 1964, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
    Last Modified 15 Feb 2016 
    Family ID F617  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Anna Bertha Grellert
              b. 24 Dec 1860, Graditz, Silesia, Prussia Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 15 Aug 1933, Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 8 Jul 1887  Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Children 
     1. Hyrum Walter Bitter
              b. 11 Jun 1888, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 7 Feb 1977, Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
     2. Edna Elizabeth Bitter
              b. 13 Nov 1889, Hyde Park, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 21 Jan 1963, Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     3. Emma Bitter
              b. 18 Sep 1891, Deming, Luna, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 2 May 1892  (Age 0 years)
     4. Leona Bitter
              b. 23 May 1893, Deming, Luna, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 14 Sep 1984  (Age 91 years)
     5. Karl Bitter
              b. 13 Mar 1895, Farmington, Davis, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1 Apr 1895  (Age 0 years)
     6. Franklin Bitter
              b. 10 Mar 1897, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 12 Jul 1973, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     7. Hedwig Louisa Bitter
              b. 14 Apr 1900, Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1982  (Age 81 years)
     8. Alma Leon Bitter
              b. 6 Mar 1903, Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 11 Mar 1903  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 15 Feb 2016 
    Family ID F613  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 2 Dec 1834 - , Kreuzburg in Oberschlesien, Opolskiego, Preussen Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAlt. Birth - 2 Dec 1834 - Königsberg, , , Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1854 - Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Sep 1859 - Königsberg, , Ostpreussen, Preussen Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Martha Bitter - 29 Aug 1860 - New York, New York, New York, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsPioneer - 20 Sep 1861 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - farmer - - Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Traugott William Bitter, Jr. - 28 Oct 1862 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Joseph Bitter, Sr. - 23 Aug 1864 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Amelia Bitter - 18 Nov 1866 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Albert Bitter - 18 Nov 1868 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - George Bitter - 17 Jan 1871 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Richard Alfred Bitter - 15 Jul 1873 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Willard Rudolph Bitter - 3 Mar 1876 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Charles Bitter - 5 Jan 1878 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 8 Jul 1887 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Hyrum Walter Bitter - 11 Jun 1888 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Edna Elizabeth Bitter - 13 Nov 1889 - Hyde Park, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Emma Bitter - 18 Sep 1891 - Deming, Luna, New Mexico, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Leona Bitter - 23 May 1893 - Deming, Luna, New Mexico, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Karl Bitter - 13 Mar 1895 - Farmington, Davis, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Franklin Bitter - 10 Mar 1897 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Hedwig Louisa Bitter - 14 Apr 1900 - Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Alma Leon Bitter - 6 Mar 1903 - Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Chronic Myocarditis, Arteriosclerosis - 25 Jan 1929 - Providence, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 28 Jan 1929 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Traugott Bitter
    Traugott Bitter
    Traugott Bitter
    Traugott Bitter
    Traugott Bitter's strawberry field
    Grandfathers Joseph & Traugott with Joseph's sons behind
    Bitter 4 generations

  • Notes 
    • INTRODUCTION by John Rogers

      TRAUGOTT AND ROSINA WILHELMINA AUST BITTER
      THE BITTER TREK ACROSS THE PLAINS - 1861
      And they walked and walked and walked and walked...
      I am a great-grandson of Traugott and Rosina Wilhelmina Aust Bitter. Their second
      son-and first surviving son-was my grandfather Joseph. His daughter Gladys Eliza was my mother, the eighth of twelve children born to Joseph Bitter and Eliza Ericksen.
      I have been blessed with a desire to inquire after my "fathers" and to learn of their circumstances. Traugott and Wilhelmina crossed the plains in 1861-on foot. I eagerly desired to know what that adventure was like. The following is the result of a search of records to find a fuller detail of their trek across the plains.
      Their trek actually started in Germany. As newlyweds (m. September 27, 1859), they sailed to America on the steamship Bavaria. Leaving Hamburg, Germany on October 14, they sailed to Southampton, England, and then across the Atlantic in 19 days arriving in New York on November 3, 1859. They settled in the "Little Germany" section of New York City and were soon befriended by others seeking religious truth. On June 5, 1861, they were baptized along with friends into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A week later they set out for what is now Utah. (See, Church News, January 24, 1981, back page; copy attached at iii.)
      Learning this, I became inquisitive concerning their crossing of the plains. What was it like? How difficult or easy was it? Did they encounter anything unusual? They made little mention of the crossing in their life histories, compiled many years later. In Traugott's words:
      "...we loaded up our baggage and started on our journey with ox-team across the plains. We all had to walk. Martha was about one year old and my wife had to carry her most of the time. Every other day, I had to drive loose cattle across the plains; two of us were assigned to this work. We did not have any remarkable experiences in crossing the plains. The Indians did not bother us but they occasionally came to get food ... We were eleven weeks on the road and arrived in Salt Lake City the 23rd of September ..."
      [Grant Bitter, compiled 1996 and before.]
      This brief account is expanded by his report of the trek to his daughter Leona Bitter Olsen; a daughter of his second [plural] marriage to Bertha Anna Grellert:
      "Next [following a train trip from New York to St. Joseph, Missouri -in June, 1861, at the start of the Civil War] they boarded a steamship that took them up the Missouri River as far as Lawrence, Nebraska. Here they had to wait for the Joseph Young Company to arrive, which took, to their disappointment, three weeks. When the company did arrive there were wagons and ox teams enough to take on their extra luggage. Most of that company had to walk. Father, along with a few other men, were given the assignment for looking out for the loose cattle, which he said caused him to make so many extra steps that he felt that it was if he had crossed the plains three times. He and his wife had to carry their baby, who was a year old, nearly all the way. The trip was very tiring because some of the cattle strayed off and he had to run to get them back in line with the herd again. But he and another man would drive the cattle only every other day so on his day off he could help carry the baby. It took them eleven weeks to make the trip but all went pretty good. They sometimes had Indians come to them but they made no trouble, just asked for food and when they received it, they went away."
      Reading these brief accounts, I concluded that (1) they didn't write much, ('probably due to their German language and writing would have been difficult'-D. Hansen comment), (2) the crossing by this time had become routine. [But, the tragedies of the handcart companies only five years before could not have been too far out of memory.] It also occurred to me that maybe someone else in the Young company might have kept a journal or diary that would shed light on the adventures of this particular company as it crossed the plains.
      Upon inquiry, I found reference to the 1861 Joseph W. Young train in Mormon Pioneer Companies Crossing the Plains (1847-1868); compiled by Bashore and Haslam (1990, 3rd Revised Edition, Historical Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints). After unsuccessful inquiry by mail about the Journal of Zebulon Jacobs, who was identified as an "out and back teamster" with this train, in 1991 I had occasion to visit Salt Lake City and took that opportunity to try and find the records myself. I was successful! One thing I learned was that by 1861 the Church had initiated "down and back" trains to carry goods from the Valley to trade in the East and to bring immigrants to the Valley on the return trip. This was an inspired program to improve trade and bring immigrants safely to Zion.
      What follows is the result of that search, shared with gratitude to all who have spent time preserving the records of the early saints:
      ·A brief report about Zebulon Jacobs,
      ·News articles and reports from the Journal History of the Church for the month of September, 1861,
      ·An account of another train crossing the plains earlier that summer. [Captain Home's train; Florence, Nebraska to Salt Lake, July 9 to September 13, 1861]. And,
      ·A transcription and summary of Brother Jacobs' journal account of the return trip from Florence, Nebraska. See the Journal History of the Church, September 23, 1861. (I have yet to find a copy of his unabridged journal, so this will have to do, at least for now.)

      Rather than taking the Young Company's trek out of context I have chosen to leave its report where I found it-chronologically located in the Journal History of the Church for September 23, 1861, the day the train arrived in the Valley-although Bro. Jacobs left the train on August 30, and went on ahead with Elder Young, arriving earlier than the train itself. This approach allows the reader to enjoy the happenings in the G.S.L. ("Great Salt Lake" area) during the month the train arrived or jump directly to the report of the trains of the summer of 1861. Of considerable interest to me, this was the summer the Civil War started, and the political climate from New York to Missouri is described. There is also mention of Johnson's Army passing these trains as it traveled back from Utah to the United States to defend the Union.
      Although Bro. Jacob's journal entries are not the words of Traugott and Wilhelmina, I hear their footsteps as they carry their baby Martha across the plains; I see them in camps along the way; I see Traugott, one of the "boys," chasing and finding the straying cattle; and I see the wonder in their eyes at the vast expanse and incredible beauty of their surroundings on their trek to Zion. I hope you enjoy their journey and learning what Zion was like when they arrived on September 23, 1861. Again, I express gratitude to all those in my family and others who have preserved these records and recollections that we may benefit from them. Thanks go especially to Zebulon Jacobs who took the time to record his experiences as part of that wagon train heading west to Zion.
      John C. Rogers, Incline Village, Nevada [Johncroger@aol.com or Johncrogers@mac.com] June, 1999; Revised November, 2001 and 2003.
      Editor's Note: The above text by John Rogers Introduction lays the background for you. I do not include the entirety of John's compiled text that includes the happenings before, during and after Traugott's trek across the plains, but only the journal entries of Zebulon Jacobs to enable you to comprehend the trek encountered by Traugott and Wilhelmina and little Martha.

      Brother Zebulon Jacob's Journal:
      23 Sept. 1861 - Captain Joseph W. Young's train, loaded with emigrants, which had left Florence, Nebraska, for the Valley arrived in Great Salt Lake City. Brother Zebulon Jacobs, one of the Church teamsters, who traveled part of the way across the Plains with said train, kept a daily journal crossing the Plains, from which we cull the following:

      Friday, July 5. I left camp (located at the head of Mill Creek, about 2 1/2 northwest of Florence) and went to Florence, after a load of Saints (who were intending to cross the Plains in Captain Young's company. The day was very warm, and I was very tired after my day's work.

      Saturday, July 6. I went down to Florence after another load of people. In making observations I saw a number of the emigrants stowed away on every nook and corner. I took my load back to camp.

      Sunday, July 7. I went down after another load, of emigrants and at night found myself back in camp. The day had been very warm.

      Monday, July 8. We stayed in camp until about 2 o'clock p. m., then drove up the cattle, and moved camp a short distance, and then went down after another load of emigrants.

      Tuesday, July 9. We stayed around camp all day. The weather was warm as usual.

      Wednesday, July 10. We hauled up another wagon and prepared for starting westward.

      Thursday, July 11. We got everything ready and moved half a mile westward and got the wagons in shape for starting the next morning. That night we had the first death in camp; and it was one of the sisters.

      Friday, July 12. We traveled about 9 miles and camped. .

      Saturday, July 13. We traveled 10 miles and crossed the Elkhorn river. We lost one woman and two children' by death.

      Sunday, July 14. We stayed at this camping ground and buried the woman and children. It rained most of the day.

      Monday, July 15. I got out in the morning to make a start, and the Captain wanted me to trade my ox-team for four mules, which I was not long in doing. I mounted the seat, took the lines and struck out. The roads were very on account of the recent rains. We camped that night 2 miles west of Fremont, a small settlement where we first struck the Platte River
      Tuesday, July 16. We traveled 8 miles through very heavy roads.
      Wednesday, July 17. This morning, Oscar B. Young and Frank F. Fox began to do the cooking. We went 15 miles, and camped one mile east of Shell Creek.
      Thursday, July 18. We traveled 16 miles and camped on the Platte.
      Friday, July 19. We traveled 9 miles and came to the Loup Fork Ferry. We got over alright, but I had the pleasure or getting a ducking several times, while the wagons over, but I was used to that. We camped a short distance from the stream, so that Captain Samuel A. Wooley would have time to move his train out of our way. He had a train of Saints.
      Saturday July 20. We traveled 10 miles and crossed Prairie Creek, and traveled 1 ½ miles further and camped.

      Sunday, July 21. We got up and went' in search of wood, but there l, so we started and traveled 5 miles in the forenoon,
      and 7 miles in the afternoon.
      Monday, July 22. We traveled 14 miles and camped at 1 o 'clock p.m. for the night.
      Tuesday, July 23. We traveled 8 miles in the forenoon, and 9 miles in the afternoon and camped. The wood was rather scarce, and the animals had to be watched very closely to keep them out of the corn, being camped very close to some fields.

      Wednesday, July 24. This being the anniversary of the coming of eat Salt Lake Valley, we were up at daylight and called out the "National Guard," which fired a valley of musketry, and any other kinds of guns that were handy. Then the "Martial Band" struck up "Hail Columbia" (the band was compose of tin pails, pans, bake-kettle lids, bells and various other instruments of music); then there was another volley by the Guard; and at sunrise, the firing of cannon (which was about 3 inches in length), and concluded the morning performance with an Indian Jig. We traveled 8 miles in the forenoon and 9 miles in the afternoon. At sunset we fired the cannon, and in the evening we had a grand ball at the Bachelors' Hall (which our mess was called).
      Thursday, July 25. We were out as usual after the mules, and after hitching them up, we traveled 7 miles and camped. Henry Parker also had a mule team, and he and I (Bro. Jebulon Jacobs) had to take care of the mules.

      Friday, July 26. After hitching up the cattle and mules, we traveled 5 ½ miles to Wood River Center, where we stopped long enough to load the provisions that we left on our way down, then traveled 5 miles further in the afternoon and camped in the evening.

      Saturday, July 27. We were out early and caught a string of fish out of the Wood River. We traveled to Nebraska Center, where we watered, then traveled 5 mile s and nooned, where there was only one well, which was hardly enough to supply a train or 80 wagons on such a hot day as this one was. Here the train divided. into two parts, Ansel P. Harmon took one train and Joseph W. Young the other until Heber P. Kimball should come up who was still behind. We passed Fort Kearney and camped on a branch of the Platte, making 11 miles in the afternoon. That night Mr. Tanner's mule train came up and camped close by. There we saw Sister Faust, who was on her return trip to Salt Lake, having been on a visit to the East.
      Sunday, July 28. We traveled a short distance and camped for noon. The day was very warm. We went on to Elm Creek and camped, making 14 miles during the day. In the evening a meeting was called and held in Capt. Kimball's train, it being close to ours. Brothers Orson Pratt, Erastus Snow and Joseph W. Young gave the people good instructions and fatherly advice about crossing the Plains and the course they should pursue to preserve their health and their lives.
      Monday, July 29. We traveled 7 miles to Buffalo Creek; had some trouble to find the cattle in the afternoon. We traveled 12 miles and camped. During the day the water was very scarce, and the people got sick of alkali, or something else. They dug holes for water, but it was very unhealthy. That evening I changed from the mess that I was in to that of the Captain's; our mess, up to that time the train was divided consisted of Samuel L. Sprague, Jun., Oscar B. Young, Erastus McIntire, Isaac Eades. Zebulon Jacobs, John Titcombe, James Savage, and Frank F. Fox. Samuel L. Sprague, Jun., went with Heber P. Kimball's train.

      Tuesday, July 30. After gathering up the mules as usual, we traveled 9 miles and nooned; in the afternoon we traveled 8 miles, and in the evening "all hands" had a family swim in the Platte.
      Wednesday, July 31. I helped to shoe an ox, and witnessed the mosquitoes and horse-flies driving off the horses and cattle, and in gathering the animals we kept what is called the dog-trot for about a mile. I finally caught a horse and jumped on him, and with considerable difficulty I succeeded in getting the animals back to camp. Some of the boys were quite sick in the morning. We traveled 9 miles in the forenoon. Nearly all the animals crossed to an island in the river and made an attack upon the afternoon we traveled 7 miles.

      Thursday, August 1. We traveled 6 miles over rather sandy roads in the afternoon, we traveled 9 ½ miles and camped on Skunk Creek, a marshy little stream.

      Friday, August 2. I took my gun out to shoot snipes, and had some trouble to get the animals into camp. We traveled 8 miles to the Pawnee Springs, where we stopped the remainder of the day. This is a beautiful spring of clear, cold water, which tastes good to the weary traveler after following the Platte so many miles. We fixed the feet of the mules, mended harness, played laundress, etc. In the evening a meeting was held in camp, but the mosquitoes were there first and stayed during the services, and finally entertained us with their music all night. I tried to sleep but all in vain.

      Saturday, August 3. I waked up the camp with the "martial Band." Drove 5 miles to Carron Creek, and waited for the train. This is a very small stream oozing out of the sand-hills to the north of the road. We traveled 4 miles and stopped for noon.
      In the afternoon we traveled 9 miles and camped one mile west of Mud Creek, a small stream heading in a lot of springs, part of which is called the Pawnee Springs. There we staved all night having a gay ball in the evening, and being entertained with a large renowned band of minstrels; they kept us dancing all night. These pests seemed to flourish here pretty well.

      Sunday, August 4. We traveled 12 miles to Bluff Fork, where we the day, and spent the time fishing, but only caught a few chubs. I saw something stirring in the water and noticed a small head and a long neck; I soon saw that it was a plump turtle, which politely walked off with my bait and hook as though he had a right to it. I went back to camp much wiser than when I left. Some of us went in the river to bathe, but we found the mosquitoes there ahead of us, and stayed it out with us. They very soon got rid of us. We held a well attended meeting in the evening. But as the mosquitoes were there in clouds, the people scattered in disgust an sought refuge in their tents, but all to no purpose; the mosquitoes were supreme everywhere.
      Monday, August 5. We made an early start in order to cross the sand-hills before the heat or the day. It was very heavy pulling, and after traveling, we stopped for noon, where buffalo chips were scarce. We moved on about 2 miles to the foot of another sand-hill and till 5 o'clock p.m. when we started once more, the heat being very oppressive and the sand-hills very bad to cross on account of the loose sand being very deep. It was dark when we camped, and we were again pestered all night by the mosquitoes.
      Tuesday, August 6. Continuing our journey we went 6 miles through heavy sand and nooned on a small creek, which issued from the hills. While journeying, Brother Henry Parker broke one of his harnesses. In the afternoon, we traveled 5 miles
      within a short distance of Cold Spring. I think the name of the stream is called Turtle Creek. That night while eating supper, the mules and horses took a notion they would go, and accordingly they went. Some us started in pursuit, but the night was so dark that we had to take advantage of the lightning to tell us which way we were going. When we saw something moving in the distance, we immediately started the chase. At last I got lost in a swamp but managed, after much trouble, to get back to camp without finding the animals.
      Wednesday, August 7. We were out by daylight looking for the animals. After finding their tracks, we followed them 9 miles, when Jos. W. (Young) and William Riter overtook us, they being on horseback, while we were on foot. Ancel P. Harmon and I took the trail and drudged back to camp, hitched up and started the train, and after going a short distance we saw the animals coming. Joseph W., and Wm. Riter had found them. We changed teams and rolled on our way rejoicing. We traveled 7 miles and camped on Rattlesnake Creek. The mosquitoes were still plentiful. We were visited by a heavy thunder storm in the night. Rattlesnake Creek is a nice stream which empties into the Platte.
      Thursday, August 8. We traveled 6 or 7 miles in the forenoon, and after traveling 7 miles in the afternoon, we reached Turtle Creek, where we camped for the night. There was a nice shower of rain.
      Friday, August 9. After enjoying a good night's rest, we were awakened early by the camp band. The mules were gathered and the journey commenced. After traveling 7 miles we nooned, and in the afternoon we traveled another 7 miles. Buffalo timber (chips) here were rather scarce and very damp, owing to the recent shower.
      Saturday, August 10. During the night were visited by a very heavy shower. We took an early breakfast, and together with one of the brethren, I crossed the river and found plenty of chokecherries and currants. After satisfying our appetites we filled our hats and pockets with berries which we took to camp and distributed them among our fellow-passengers. Finding breakfast ready, we ate heartily. In re-crossing the river we got dunked several times, but hung on to the fruit. We next gathered willows for fuel and after dinner we traveled 2 ½ miles and camped opposite Ash Hollow, on the ground called Squaw Killer Harney's battle ground, thus named because of his (Harney's) killing a number of Indian squaws. The mosquitoes at this point were rather friendly; we are now 378 miles from Florence.
      Sunday, August 11. We traveled 7 miles in the forenoon to a small stream and nooned. We traveled ten miles in the af'ternoon and toward night. We were visited by a heavy rain storm. "Chips" were scarce in this locality and most of us only had a few crumbs for supper. The rain water stood in pools everywhere in the road. The people fared rather "slim" between wet and no wood.
      Monday, August 12. Making an early start, we traveled 3 1/2 miles and came to the Platte River, having made a 13 ½ mile drive without water. After breakfast we moved 7 miles to Crab Creek, where we took dinner and supper. At 4:30 p.m. we rolled out again, and traveled 7 miles rather late in the evening.
      Tuesday, August 13. After eating a late breakfast, we traveled over a cobble stone hill and camped for noon, after traveling five miles; in the afternoon we traveled 7 miles, part of the time during a heavy fall of' rain.
      Wednesday, August 14. Joseph W. Young mended his carriage. In the forenoon we traveled 7 miles and in the afternoon 10 miles; camped for the night on the banks of the Platte.

      Thursday, August 15. We gathered our long eared horses and trave1ed 10 miles. In the afternoon we traveled 7 miles and camped opposite Chimney Rock.

      Friday, August 16. We traveled 8 miles in the f'orenoon over somewhat sandy roads, and in the afternoon traveled 10 miles and camped opposite Scott's Bluff. In wet weather the traveling through this part of the country was very disagreeable owing to the softness of' the soil and a number of spring streams which cross the road. I came very near on a rattlesnake which scared me but 1 succeeded in killing it.

      Saturday, August 17. As we woke up in the morning all hands began laughing at each other, as our faces were besmeared with tar and wagon grease. Some of the boys from the other camp had paid us a visit and left their compliments upon our faces. We traveled nine miles and nooned on a small creek where several oxen were shod. In the afternoon we traveled 9 miles and camped on the Platte.

      Sunday, August 18. We traveled 9 miles in the forenoon and 8 mile making our night encampment at a place where wood was plentiful.

      Monday, August 19. We traveled 10 miles in the forenoon and 7 miles; we camped for the night on a large sand bank and were visited by heavy showers.

      Tuesday, August 20. In the morning the sky was overcast with thick clouds and soon it commenced to rain, which prevented us from starting until 4 o'clock p.m. After that we traveled 6 miles and camped late in the evening.

      Wednesday, August 21. During the night considerable rain had fallen. We met Joseph W. Young coming back from Deer Creek. About noon we passed Fort Laramie which is called the half way between the Missouri River and our mountain home. It consists of a small collection of buildings forming something square which is garrisoned by U. S. troops to protect the emigration from the encroachment of Indians. We traveled five miles and camped on the opposite bank. I was in the water most of the afternoon helping the teams across. The weather was cold.

      Thursday, August 22. We made an early start and traveled 6 miles in the forenoon through the Black Hills. The roads were rather rough compared to what they were in traveling up the Platte River. In the afternoon we traveled ten miles and formed our encampment late in the evening. We had to go about three-fourths of a mile for water, which we found in the dark.. While the mules were drinking I found chokecherries, of which I ate freely. Being on guard, I took the mules up a large ravine and stayed until midnight when Bro. Henry Parker relieved me.
      Friday, August 23. I was out early getting water and cherries. When we rolled out after breakfast, some thirty head of cattle of cattle were missing. William Riter and Joseph Weiler stopped to hunt for them; while the company traveled six miles and nooned by a beautiful spring. In the afternoon we traveled 9 miles and camped on the Platte late in the evening.

      Saturday, August 24. We traveled 6 miles in the forenoon and stopped forenoon close to a large grove of cottonwood, in which a few years ago the Indians killed quite a number of white people who were traveling west. In the afternoon we traveled 6 miles, crossed the Platte River the second time, went three miles further and camped by a beautiful grove.
      When Bro. Parker and I were on guard about 10 o'clock we say a man coming toward us. We hailed him the second time but he failed to stop so we stopped him and found that he belonged to Heber P. Kimball's train which was a short distance ahead of us. The boys had induced him to catch rabbits in Yankee fashion by building a small fire and lying down by it with an open sack for the rabbits to run into, and then hit them on the head with a club, now and then giving a low whistle; other boys going out to drive the rabbits in, when, all of the sudden the boys gave a yell. The man thought the Indians were upon him, and off he started at full run. He had run about a mile when we stopped him. The fellow was scared out of his wits. The cause of his scare was this that he knew everything but Yankee tricks. We took him back to his train which was three-fourths of a mile distant. The method of catching rabbits were described was just a trick played on the man.

      Sunday, August 25. We started as usual and traveled ten miles in the forenoon. We stopped for dinner a short distance from the Platte, the sun being very warm. In the afternoon we went five miles and crossed the Platte a third time. Both trains crossed the river the same afternoon and camped on the bank. Meeting was held in the evening.

      Monday, August 26. I waked up with a putrid sore throat, but went out to drive up the stock. When hitching up, we saw the remains of Johnston's army on their homeward march after their endeavor to put down the "Mormon" rebellion. We had to wait for them to pass. They were rather a rusty looking lot. We traveled 9 miles and nooned on a bluff. In the afternoon we traveled 7 miles and camped in the hills a long way from the Platte and six miles east of Deer Creek.

      Tuesday, August 27. The morning was rather stormy. Continuing our journey we soon reached Deer Creek and there loaded into our wagons the flour which was left there going east. We traveled 2 ½ miles further and stopped for noon. In the afternoon, we traveled five miles.

      Wednesday, August 28. We traveled nine miles through a very hilly country and nooned. This morning some of our cattle were missing and the boys were sent after them; we traveled 7 miles in the afternoon.

      Thursday, August 29. We traveled to the Upper Platte Bridge and loaded up the flour which was stored there for our use; went on a short distance further there and camped for noon after traveling 11 miles. Continuing the journey in the afternoon we left "our faithful friend, the Platte River" and took to the hills. We made a dry camp at night.

      Friday, August 30. Henry Parker and I were sent out in the morning to hunt for mission mules. After finding them and returning to camp, it was discovered that quite a number of oxen were missing so we started out again for them, and after going two or three mi1es we met Joseph Weiler with the cattle. Our train moved on to Willow Springs Creek, where we nooned after traveling 9 miles. While nooning, Joseph W.Young asked me to go on with him ahead of our train to overtake the emigration and settle up with them for their fare. Consequently, we left the train behind and went on to Fish Creek, five miles, and took supper with Heber P. Kimball. We then moved on and camped with Captain Sam. A. Woolley's train, about 12 o'clock, midnight. We stopped until daylight with that train.
      [Editors Note: At this time, Brother Zebulon Jacobs, journal then proceeds with the new assignment he had received from Joseph W. Young. What follows is his diary of his trip into the Great Salt Lake City. He apparently followed the same route that the Young train follows into the Valley. His notes are illustrative of the events he faced along the trail. You will note the advanced speed that he traveled being without the many wagons in the Young train.]

      Sat. Aug 31. We went over to Independence Rock, ten miles distant and took breakfast. Here we struck the Sweetwater for the first time and also the rocky-mountains which looked good to the eye and gladdens the heart, after traveling so long along the monotonous Platte River. The water of a stream is gladly drunk by one who has passed the greater part of his life among the mountains. At Independence Rock I went out hunting sage hens, which I saw flying around, but did not ki1l any. Continued the journey, we passed Devi1's Gate, through which the Sweetwater flows over large boulders. Traveling on, we overtook Captain Potter's train and took dinner after traveling 25 miles. We then went on, passing the three crossings of Sweetwater and camped after traveling 25 miles in the afternoon. The so-called three crossings of the Sweetwater is a beautiful place, the majestic mountains of rocks on either side making grand scenery. The crossings are close together, two of' them only a few rods apart and the other 600 yards off'. After going through the narrow place we saw a lake of fresh water about ¾ of a mile to the right.

      Sunday, Sept. 1. As soon as it was daylight we gathered the mules and traveled 8 or 10 miles before breakfast; we then went on traveling 23 miles further and took dinner. After that, we traveled until sundown and took supper with Louis Silver at the foot of Rocky Ridge. We then crossed the ridge which is rightly named, and crossed Strawberry and Willow Creek, and finally crossed Sweetwater, Rock Creek and Willow Creek, and finally crossed Sweetwater for the last time and camped a short distance further on, having traveled 27 miles that day.

      Monday, Sept. 2. At daylight we resumed our journey, crossed the Divide or South Pass, which divides the waters of the Sweetwater from those on the west, which form the tributaries of the Green River. We moved on rather rapidly, passed Pacific Creek, Dry Sandy, and went 3 or 4 miles further, stopping for noon, making 22 miles that morning. While nooning, the mail coach came up, and Joseph W. Young took passage in it for the Valley, leaving me alone. I hitched up, and drove on, crossed Little Sandy and Big Sandy, and took supper at sundown. I then crossed Simpson's or Corral Hollow and camped for the night after dark. During the afternoon I had traveled 20 miles. I camped alone with my team and wagon.

      Tuesday, Sept. 3. Continuing the journey at daylight, I soon overtook Brother Merkley, with whom I conversed a short time, and then drove on 5 miles further, and overtook Captain Ira Eldredge's train, which was just getting ready to start. I delivered up a mare that we found near Fort Laramie. After breakfast I went on and crossed the Green River, wend down the old road, and out on the bench and stopped for noon. The sun made it hot and uncomfortable. After traveling 20 miles, I reached Ham's Fork, but continued the journey 25 miles further to Black's Fork, where I round Captain Joseph Horne's train, where I joined the people in that camp in a dance on the rough floor in the evening.

      Wednesday, Sept. 4. In the morning I found my mules missing. Going up Black Fork about 3 miles I found them, and brought them (together with some more horses that were with them) back to my wagon. I found that they belonged to Capt. Horne's train. Brother Richard Horne, who had been slightly injured, now became my traveling companion, and I was very glad of his company. We started on and came to Fort Bridger, where we had supper with Daniel Seegmiller. Here we found Captains John R. Murdock and Homer Duncan's trains. After supper we traveled about 8 miles e night, having traveled during the day 40 miles.

      Thursday, Sept. 5. We continued the journey at daylight and traveled on to Soda Springs, where we stopped for
      breakfast. We ate dinner on Bear River, and supper at Cache Cave, whence we drove down Echo Canyon 3 or 4 miles, traveling together 45 miles during the day.

      Friday, Sept. 6. We continued the journey at the break of day; traveled down Echo Canyon and took breakfast at the mouth of said canyon, fed the animals and continued the journey to East Canyon, and in the evening rolled in at the ranch of Ephraim Hanks in Parley's Canyon, after crossing Big Mountain. Brother Hanks gave us a square meal for supper.

      Saturday, Sept. 7. Con t1nuing the journey we rolled over to Great Salt Lake City, arriving there at 8:30 a.m. and took breakfast at home.
      [Editor's Note: On Monday, Sept. 23. Rain fell most of the day in Salt Lake City. Elder Joseph W. Young and company arrived at 2:00 p.m. There were between 80 and 90 wagons in his train, including President Young's wagons which were loaded with machinery and merchandise. It was on the train that Traugott and Wilhelmina and little daughter, Martha, arrived in Salt Lake City on Sept. 23, 1861]

      On Tuesday, Sept. 24. The day was pleasant in Salt Lake City. The addition to and repairs on the Tabernacle are progressing favorably. The new flooring is being laid and the addition which is on the north side of the shape of a half circle, is being lathed preparatory to plastering. On the outside, the addition in the shape of a dome, which is being boarded with lumber. Two new doorways are being built on the east.

      [Comments of the Editor, B. Dale Hansen on Nov. 9, 2003: Like John Rogers and his impressions in the header, I am in wonderment in contemplating how Traugott and Wilhelmina felt as they arrived in the Valley. A long way from Germany where their travels began at marriage, on to New York City, finding the true gospel which they embraced with all their heart, the decision to sell everything in NYC and board a train to St. Louis, then the ferry up the Mississippi to Nebraska to begin their journey across the Plains with their little daughter, Martha, then the struggle that ensued in the weeks upon the trail leading to the Great Salt Lake Valley which you have just read. Though the journal does not list the names of Traugott and Wilhelmina, they were there. I, like John, can see them in this passage. I hope you can capture the feeling and experience of the legacy that they have left the Bitter Family with. God DID INDEED bless them as they prepared a place for their family AND WE ARE THE BENEFICIARIES OF THEIR LABORS.
      BITTER, TRAUGOTT (son of Gotthard Bitter, born 1802, Schnakainen, East Prussia, Germany, and Luisa Neuman, born 1801). He was born Dec. 2, 1834, Kreuzburg, East Prussia, Germany). Came to Utah Sept. 20, 1861, Joseph Young company.

      Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.758 Married Wilhelmina R. Aust Sept, 25, 1859 (daughter of Gottfried Bernhard Aust and Louisa Charlotte Huebner), who was born June 6, 1836, and came to Utah with husband, Their children: Martha b. Aug. 29, 1860, m. Hyrum Ricks April 1, 1880; William b. Oct. 28, 1862, d. Oct. 15, 1863; Joseph b. Aug. 24, 1864, m. Eliza Erickson March 8, 1888; Amelia b. Nov. 18, 1866; Albert b. Nov. 18, 1868, d. July 27, 1870; George b. Jan. 17, 1871, d. Oct. 22, 1872; Richard Alfred b. July 15, 1873; Willard Rudolph b. March 3, 1876, d. Jan. 5, 1890; Charles b. Jan. 5, 1878, m. Printha E. Facer Oct. 15, 1902. Family home Logan, Utah.

      Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.758 High priest. Carpenter on Salt Lake theater. Moved to St. George in 1862, to Logan in 1864, where he helped build the Logan temple and tabernacle.

      !EVERYTHING ON THIS SHEET HAS BEEN VERIFIED FROM THE SALT LAKE FAMILY HISTORY CENTER FROM ORIGINAL RECORDS [9]
    • (Medical):Contributory (secondary): senility [11]

  • Sources 
    1. [S199] Wiggins, Marvin E., "Mormons and Their Neighbors: An Index to Over 80,000 Biographical Sketches from 1820 to 1985 of Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Non Latter-day Saints Living in LDS Communities. 2nd ed., rev. and enlarged."  ((Provo:Utah, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, 1996.)).

    2. [S38] Esshom, Frank, ed., "Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah Comprising Photographs, Genealogies, Biographies"  ((Salt Lake City:UT, Utah Pioneers Book Publishing Company, 1913), Family History Library (Special Collections), 35 North West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84150. Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah #79000), Photo page 531; page 758.

    3. [S1461] Providence History Committee, "Providence and Her People: A History of Providence, Utah, 1857-1974" Second edition.  ((Providence:UT, Keith W. Watkins and Sons, 1974)), page 307; Photo page 307.

    4. [S1462] Division of Health, Center for Health Statistics, "Wisconsin: Vital statistics"  ((Madison, Wis. : Wisconsin Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Health, Center for Health Statistics, [1986-); Public health statistics (Madison, Wis. : 1977) 0888-8094 (DLC) 88641294 (OCoLC)8758595; Govt. doc# He 1 St.1:1984- widocs; OCLC # ocm13416563).

    5. [S33] Bitter, Joseph E., "Genealogical Research of the Bitter Family History"  (Family History and Genealogy, 1968).

    6. [S1402] Personal knowledge of Kirk Larson, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    7. [S1403] The Generations Network, "Ancestry Family Trees," database.

    8. [S1410] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, database, FamilySearch   ((http://www.familysearch.org)), )..

    9. [S36] compiled by Richard Ricks [(E-ADDRESS), & MAILING ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE], Cedar Hills, UT, 84062, "Artel Ricks.ged," supplied by Ricks, 10 Jan 2010; copy held by [RESEARCHER & CONTACT INFORMATION FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    10. [S1463] United States Census Bureau, Census: U.S. Federal Population 1880  (Internet [Database Online] at www.ancestry.com), Roll T9_1335; Family History Film: 1255335; Page: 129.3000; Enumeration District: 8; ..

    11. [S1464] State of Utah - Department of Health, Trougott Bitter death certificate  (1929).

    12. [S1465] PRITCHETT, MORGAN H., and KLAUS WUST., "German Immigrants to Baltimore: The Passenger Lists of 1854."  (In The Report: A Journal of German-American History., Part 1, vol. 38, (1982), pp. 52-109.), p. 83.

    13. [S38] Esshom, Frank, ed., "Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah Comprising Photographs, Genealogies, Biographies"  ((Salt Lake City:UT, Utah Pioneers Book Publishing Company, 1913), Family History Library (Special Collections), 35 North West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84150. Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah #79000), Page 758.


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