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Reverend John Lathrop

Reverend John Lathrop[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]

Male 1584 - 1653  (68 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name John Lathrop  [3, 12
    Prefix Reverend 
    Born 20 Dec 1584  Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    • Etton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England
    Christened 20 Dec 1584  Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    • Elton, Cherry Burton, Yorkshire, England
    Gender Male 
    Biography
    • His will was dated 10 Aug 1653 and the inventory of his estate was taken on 8 Dec 1653. The value was stated to be £72. 16s. 6d. Married (1) 10 Oct 1610, Eastwell, Kent, England, HANNAH HOUSE/Howse, born about 1597, Eastwell, Kent, England, died 16 Feb 1633, London, England; daughter of Rev. John Howse and Alice _____ Married (2) 17 Feb 1636/7 per Otis or before 14 June 1635 per Lowthrop Gen, ANN (_____) Hammond, died 25 Feb 1687/8, Barnstable, Massachusetts.
              Of the early life of Mr. Lothrop little is known. The Rev. Dr. John Lothrop, late of Boston, in a memoir published in the first volume of the second series of the Mass. Historical Society's publications, says that these is "no doubt that Oxford was the place of Mr. Lothrop's public education."  He refers to Wood's 'Athenoe et Fasti Oxonienses, published in 1691, as his authority. Wood professes to record the names of those "who have been admitted to one of two academical degree of degrees, in the ancient and most famous university of Oxford."  He names "Mr. John Lothrop" not however in the list of those educated at that university. Mr. Savage, who has given much attention to the subject, and has personally examined the records of several of the colleges, says tradition is the authority for the statement that Mr. Lothrop was educated at Oxford. Deane, in his history of Scituate, states that Mr. Lothrop was educated at Oxford. He relied on Dr. Lothrop as his authority, who evidently mistakes the meaning of the passage in Wood's Fasti. John matriculated at Queens College, Cambridge in 1601. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1605 and, in 1607, on his twenty- third birthday, John was ordained a deacon by the Bishop of Lincoln and began service for the Church of England as a curate of Bennington, Hertfordshire. After graduation in 1609 with a Master of Arts degree, John Lothrop was admitted as the perpetual curate in charge of the Egerton Church in Kent, a parish four miles east of Eastwell and forty -eight miles southeast of London. This was the second and last parish in which he officiated for the Anglican Church.
              The ancestor of the family wrote his name John Lothropp. All his sons omitted the final p. His son Samuel sometimes wrote his name Lathrop, and many of his descendants in Connecticut and Western Massachusetts so spell the name. In the records we find the name written Lathropp, Lothrop, Lathrop, Laythrop, and Lawthrop. In Wood's Fasti the name is written Lathrop and Lowthrope. Calamy, Neal, Crosley, Winthrop and Prince, write the name Lathrop.
              In 1624 Mr. Lothrop removed to London, and was chosen the successor of the Rev. Henry Jacob, the first pastor of the first Independent or Congregationalist Society in London. Wood, speaking of Mr. Jacob, says he "was a Kentish man, born in 1563, entered a commoner in Saint Maries Hall 1579, aged 16; took the degree in arts and holy orders, and became beneficied in his own country. He was a person most excellently well read in theological authors, but withal a most zealous puritan; or, as his son Henry used to say, the first Independent in England."  The historian adds, "Henry Jacob, educated in the low countries under Thomas Erpenius, the famous critick, was actually created Bachelor of Arts by virtue of the letters of the chancellors of the university, written in his behalf. He was soon after elected probationer fellow of Merton College, and is hereafter most deservedly to be inserted among the writers in the 2d volume of this work." [Athenoe et Fasti Oaxen.]
              He was one of the puritans who fled from the persecution of Bishop Bancroft. At Leyden Mr. Jacob conferred with Mr. Robinson, and embraced his peculiar sentiments of church discipline, since known by the name of Independency. In 1616 he returned to England, and Mr. Neal in his history of the Puritans infers that he imparted his design of setting up a separate congregation, like those in Holland, to the most learned puritans of those times, it was not condemned as unlawful, considering that there was no prospect of a national reformation. Mr. Jacob having summoned several of his friends together, and obtained their consent to unite in church fellowship for enjoying the ordinances of Christ in the purest manner, they laid the foundation of the first 'Independent' or 'Congregational' church in England.
              This statement of Mr. Neal is perhaps not historically exact. There were Independents in England as early as the time of Wickliffe. The first Independent Church organized in England was that at Scrooby, by Bradford, Brewster, Robinson and others, in 1606. As this church consisted only of a few members, and in a few years after its organization removed to Leyden, perhaps it is not entitled to the honor of being called the first in England; certainly not if permanency is considered an element in arriving at a right conclusion. Mr. Neal knew the history of the Scrooby church, yet did not consider it entitled to the honor of being called the 'the first'.  This is an interesting fact, because many of the members of the Barnstable church had been members of the church in Southwalk, London. Mr. Jacob had resided some at Leyden prior to the year 1616, and was familiar with the discipline and government of Mr. Robinson's church, and adopted its forms and its covenant in the organization of the church in London.
              Looking to the Lowthrop Gen for information on the beginnings of the Independent Church we find:  At Egerton, John Lowthrop labored faithfully as long as he could approve of the ritual and government of the Anglican Church. But when he could bear it no longer, he renounced his orders to fulfill the ministry to which his conscience and his heart had called him. In 1623, at the age of thirty -nine, with five children to support, John left the Church of England and subscribed to the teachings of the Independent Church, often called the Separatist or Congregational Church.  This nonconformist denomination was founded secretly in Southward, Surrey in 1616. A major reason for its break from the Church of England was the dispute over whether authority of leadership came from God to the church to the minister or from God to the people to the minister. The right of the people to choose their own minister in the Congregational Church today has its root in this early movement.
              When in 1620 a part of the church at Leyden removed to Plymouth, they carried with them the old Scrooby covenant, and recognized the form of church government adopted by the Independents in Holland and England. The famous compact drawn up and signed on board the 'Mayflower' called by eminent legislators the 'first written constitution', was borrowed from this church organization with some slight variations to adapt it to their wants as a civil community. The first church in Salem, in Charlestown, the second in Boston, the Scituate and Barnstable churches, had essentially the same covenant. Very few of the first settlers of the Massachusetts Colony had belonged to Independent churches in England or Holland. The large majority were Separatists or Puritans, as nicknamed by their opponents.  There was, however, little difference between them in matters of faith and practice. The Plymouth people were more Catholic, more tolerant to those who differed from them in opinion. The "Mayflower Compact" read in part as follows:  "In ye name of God, Amen, We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread sovereign Lord, King James,...doe by these presents solemnly & mutually in ye presence of God, and one of another, covenant & combine ourselves together into a civil body politick,...and by vertue hearof to enacte, constitute, and frame such just & equall lawes, ordinances, acts, constititions, & ofices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete & convenient for ye generall good of ye Colonie, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience."
              Neal thus describes the manner in which the first Independent Church was formed in London. "Having observed a day of solemn fasting and prayer for a blessing upon their undertaking towards the close of the solemnity, each of them made open confession of his faith in our Lord Jesus Christ; then standing together they joined hands, and solemnly covenanted with each other in the presence of Almighty God, to walk together in all God's ways and ordinances, according as he had already revealed, or 'should further make' known to them."
              "Mr. Jacob was then chosen pastor by the suffrage of the brotherhood, and others were appointed to the office of deacons, with fasting and prayer, and imposition of hands."  Mr. Jacob continued with his people about eight years; but in the year 1624, being desirous to enlarge his usefulness, he went with their consent to Virginia, where he soon after died.
              Charles I, who came to the throne in 1625, tried to make all political and religious institutions conform to his will. He found Parliament uncooperative in fulfilling his wishes, so he tried to rule alone. He had to raise his own money by reviving obsolete customs and duties. He levied tonnage and poundage (import/export duties). He revived compulsory knighthood, requiring every subject whose income was £40 a year to accept knighthood or pay a fine. The king sold monopolies, titles, and church positions to the highest bidder and enforced the collection of fines against Roman Catholics who refused to take an oath of allegiance. He mortgaged crown lands, pawned the crown jewels, and collected free gifts from knights and other selected persons. He defied Parliament by levying taxes without approval, rousing particular furor by levy of Ship Money. This was a tax usually imposed on port cities to build and equip warships which Charles extended to all communities.
              William Laud, Bishop of London, equalled the singlemindedness of his sovereign in his opposition to the Puritan movement. The Puritans wanted simpler forms of worship and stricter controls over morals. Bishop Laud, with the cooperation of King James I and his successor, Charles I, had canons decreed for the excommunication of all who opposed him and his doctrines, or who did not affirm that the Church of England was the true apostolic church. Any persons who separated themselves from the Church "and [took] unto themselves the names of another church not established by law" could be accused of heresy. Repeated offenses could lead to charges of high treason, punishable by death, usually by burning at the stake.
              In 1633, Charles I elevated Bishop Laud to Archbishop of Canterbury and empowered him to reform the entire Church of England. Laud, determined to impose a uniform system of worship on all Englishmen, outlawed unadorned buildings and simple services, reviewed and licensed all publications, held burnings of books and pamphlets which did not pass the censor, denounced landowners who were encroaching on church lands for private profit, and ordered inspection tours of all parishes to determine the orthodoxy of the clery and the use of the Book of Common Prayer.
              Together, King Charles and Archbishop Laud prosecuted scores if Puritans on charges, real and imagined, before the king's courts. Cruel punishments, long unused, were revived; branding, nose splitting, amputation of ears, enormous fines, and long imprisonments.
              Laud sent out a mandate ordering constables and other authorities to seek out groups who might be having religious meetings not under Anglican jurisdiction. When they found such private and illegal church gatherings, they were to seize, apprehend, and attack all persons involved, and to keep them in safe custody until they could be dealt with by the established clergy. A special watch was kept on eleven congregations in London, one of which was John Lothrop's group.
              Unable to locate Lothrop himself, Laud sent agents to ferret him out in the secret nooks where a group of "rebels" might meet. On 22 Apr 1632 Reverend Lothrop's group met for worship as usual, in the house of Humphrey Barnet, a brewer's clerk in Black Friars, London. Suddenly, the room was invaded by a ruffian band let by Tomlinson, Laud's warrantofficer.  They overpowered the Christian group's resistance and seized forty-two men.  Only eighteen escaped. Handed over in fetters, they lingered for months in Newgate prison, which had been built for felons.
              In 1633, while Lothrop was incarcerated, a split took place in the Independent Church. Those who irrevocably denied that the established church was true and rejected infant baptism, broke off under the leadership of John Spilsbury and later joined the Baptists. The remainder continued loyal to Lothrop.
              By the spring of 1634, all but John Lothrop were released from prison on bail. As their leader and the chief offender, he was deemed too dangerous to be set free. It was said of Lothrop that "his genius will still haunt all the pulpits in ye country, when any of his scoler may be admitted to preach." During his stay in prison, John Lothrop became convinced that the superstitious usages of the Church of England were wrong and he rejected their ceremonies as relics of idolatry. With a desire to reform the Sacrament of bread and wine, and to abandon the use of the surplice, the sign of the cross in baptism, and other outward ceremonies and forms, Lothrop joined hands with the Puritans, even though he did not agree wholeheartedly with their religious views.
              Even as he took this stand virually guaranteeing to keep him behind bars, a fatal sickness weakened his wife, Hannah, and left her near death. The "New England's Memorial," (1699), by Nathaniel Morton gives this touching account of the incident and the events which followed:
              His wife fell sick, of which sickness she died. He procurred liberty of the bishop to visit his wife before her death, and commended her to God by prayer, who soon gave up the ghost. At his return to prison, his poor children, being many, repaired to the Bishop at Lambeth, and made known unto him their miserable condition by reason of their father"s being continued in close durrance, who commiserated their condition so far as to grant him liberty, who soon after came over into New England.
              At Hannah's death, the seven surviving Lothrop children ranged in ages from five to eighteen years. One source indicates that Lothrop's followers dressed the children in their best and presented them to Archbishop Laud, demanding to know who was to care for them.
              After the death of his wife, Lothrop petitioned for liberty to go into foreign exile, and the petition was granted 24 Apr 1634. He was required to give bond and his word that he would not "be present at any private conventicles."  He did, however, delay his departure long enough to reorganize the meetings of his congregation, which was joined at this time of crisis by William Kiffin's group. On 12 June 1634, order was given by the High Commission Court that "John Lothrop, of Lambeth Marsh, be attached if he appear not on the next court day."  When he did not appear, an order was given that Lothrop was to be imprisoned again if he did not appear in court on June 19. He did not appear, and another deadline, Oct 9, passed.  Finally, on 19 Feb 1635, Lothrop and his campatriot, Samuel Eaton, were ordered taken into custody for contempt. By this time, however, Lothrop was in New England. John, accompanied by six of his seven living children, thirty-two members of his church, and many others, had sailed on the 'Griffin' from London to Boston. Eaton did not fare as well and reportedly died in a London prison 31 Aug 1639.
    Immigration 18 Sep 1634  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 11, 12, 19
    Name John Lothrop 
    Name John Lothropp  [18
    Occupation
    • Minister / Reverend
    Died 8 Nov 1653  Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Buried 10 Nov 1653  Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    John Lothropp Grave Memorial
    John Lathrop grave marker
    Person ID I10107  Full Tree | Bingham, Boulter, Palmer, Timmins, Frint
    Last Modified 22 Dec 2014 

    Father Thomas Lothrop, Sr.
              b. 18 Jun 1536, Cherry Burton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 5 Oct 1606, Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Mother Mary Howell
              b. Abt 1556, Yoxall, , Staffordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 6 Jan 1588, Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 32 years) 
    Married 29 Jul 1574  Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [18, 20, 21, 22, 23
    Family ID F4693  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Father Thomas Lothrop, Sr.
              b. 18 Jun 1536, Cherry Burton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 5 Oct 1606, Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Mother Mary Salte
              b. Abt 1553, of Yoxall, , Staffordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 16 Jan 1588, Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Relationship Disproved 
    Family ID F81698  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Wife 1 Hannah House
              b. Abt 1594, Eastwell, Ashford, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 16 Feb 1633, London, , Greater London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 39 years) 
    Married 10 Oct 1610  Eastwell, Ashford, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18
    Children 
    +1. Thomas Lathrop, Sr.
              b. 21 Feb 1612, Eastwell, Ashford, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 4 Apr 1701, Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
    +2. Jane Lathrop
              b. 29 Sep 1614, Egerton, Huddersfield, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. Aft 1658, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years)
     3. Anne Lathrop
              b. 12 May 1616, Egerton, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 30 Apr 1617, Egerton, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     4. John Lathrop, Jr.
              b. 22 Feb 1617, Egerton, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 19 Jul 1638, Egerton, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 21 years)
     5. Barbara Lathrop
              b. 31 Oct 1619, Egerton, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 19 Jul 1638, of Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)
    +6. Judge Samuel Lathrop, Sr.
              b. 1622-1623, Egerton, , Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 29 Feb 1700, Norwich, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
    +7. Joseph Lathrop, Lieutenant Captain
              b. 11 Apr 1624, London, , Greater London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 9 Apr 1702, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    +8. Benjamin Lathrop
              b. 11 Apr 1624, of London, , Greater London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 3 Jul 1691, Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     9. Sarah Lothrop
              b. Abt 1628, Egerton, Huddersfield, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. Bef 18 Sep 1634, Egerton, Huddersfield, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 6 years)
    Last Modified 25 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F4510  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Wife 2 Anna Penn Hammond
              b. 14 Jul 1616, Lavenham, , Suffolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 25 Feb 1687, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 27 Sep 1634  Etton, , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18
    Children 
     1. Honorable Barnabas Lathrop
              b. Jun 1636, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 26 Oct 1715, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 79 years)
     2. Barnabas Lothrop, Sr.
              b. 6 Jun 1636, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 26 Oct 1715, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     3. Lathrop
              b. 30 Jul 1638, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 30 Jul 1638, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     4. Lothrop
              b. 30 Jul 1638, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 30 Jul 1638, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     5. Abigail Lothrop
              b. 2 Nov 1639, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 4 Dec 1742  (Age 103 years)
     6. Bathsheba Lothrop
              b. 27 Feb 1641, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 8 Jan 1723, Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     7. Captain John Lathrop, Jr.
              b. 9 Feb 1644, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 18 Sep 1727, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     8. Elizabeth Lathrop
              b. 27 Mar 1648, Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. Aft 1690, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
     9. Lothrop
              b. 25 Jan 1649, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 25 Jan 1649, Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 25 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F4694  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 20 Dec 1584 - Etton, , Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 20 Dec 1584 - Etton, , Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 10 Oct 1610 - Eastwell, Ashford, , Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Thomas Lathrop, Sr. - 21 Feb 1612 - Eastwell, Ashford, , Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Jane Lathrop - 29 Sep 1614 - Egerton, Huddersfield, , Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Anne Lathrop - 12 May 1616 - Egerton, , Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - John Lathrop, Jr. - 22 Feb 1617 - Egerton, , Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Barbara Lathrop - 31 Oct 1619 - Egerton, , Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Judge Samuel Lathrop, Sr. - 1622-1623 - Egerton, , Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Joseph Lathrop, Lieutenant Captain - 11 Apr 1624 - London, , Greater London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Benjamin Lathrop - 11 Apr 1624 - of London, , Greater London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sarah Lothrop - Abt 1628 - Egerton, Huddersfield, , Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 18 Sep 1634 - Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 27 Sep 1634 - Etton, , Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Honorable Barnabas Lathrop - Jun 1636 - Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Barnabas Lothrop, Sr. - 6 Jun 1636 - Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Lathrop - 30 Jul 1638 - Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Lothrop - 30 Jul 1638 - Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Abigail Lothrop - 2 Nov 1639 - Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Bathsheba Lothrop - 27 Feb 1641 - Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Captain John Lathrop, Jr. - 9 Feb 1644 - Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Elizabeth Lathrop - 27 Mar 1648 - Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Lothrop - 25 Jan 1649 - Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 Nov 1653 - Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 10 Nov 1653 - Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Reverend John Lathrop
    Queens College at Cambridge, England
    Lothropp's church in Etton
    Drawing of old Clink Prison
    Clink Prison Museum in London
    Map showing location of Clink Prison
    Newgate Prison
    Page from John's Bible showing patch.
    Sacrament Rock  in Barnstable
    Sign in front of Sturgis Library
    West Parish Meeting House
    Lowethrope Meadows Plaque
    Lothropp Room in Sturgis Library

    Documents
    Book page listing John and Hannah's marriage
    Famous Descendants of John Lathrop

    Headstones
    Marker on site of the first Church in Scituate
    Close up of Scituate Church marker
    Close up of Sacrament Rock marker
    Marker noting the site of the first Church in Barnstable
    East Parish Church Marker
    Lothrop Cemetery Barnstable Mass.
    Men of Kent Marker

    Heraldry and Misc.
    John Lathrop's Bible and Signature
    Plaque on the Clink Prison in the Tower of London
    Sturgis Library part of which was Reverend John Lothropp's home

  • Notes 
    • Came to America in 1634 for religious freedom, exiled from England.  Sailed on the ship Griffin, arrived in Boston September 18,1634.

      Common ancestor of the Prophet Joseph Smith, Wilford Woodruff, Orson and Parley P. Pratt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and many other notable people.  (and us)  It has been estimated that during the early Church of Joseph Smith's time, that one-quarter of the Church members were descendants of John Lothropp.

      Other sources say he was born in Elton, East Riding, Yorkshire, son of Thomas of Cherry Burton, and grandson of John Lowthorpe of Lowthorpe, Yorkshire, fist settled in Egertown in Kent, and afterwards succeeded Henry Jacob as pastor of the Southwark Church in London.  He came over in the Griffin, 1634, and settled first in Scituate (pronounced Skit'-u-et), and then in Barnstable, 1639.

      He wrote his name John Lothropp.  All of his sons omitted the final p.  His son Samuel sometimes wrote his name Lathrop, and many of his descendants in Connecticut and Western Massachusetts so spell the name.  In the records we find the name written Lathropp, Lothrop, Lathrop, Laythrop, and Lawthrop.  In Wood's Fasti the name is written Lathrop and Lowthrope.  Calamy, Neal, Crosley, Winthrop and Prince, write the name Lathrop.

      The following history was taken from....  http:/home.earthlink.net/`jameshistory/j_lothrop.html
          
      John was a minister in the Church of England in Egerton.  He left the Chruch of England because he didn't approve of their teachings.  He believed the church's teachings were not in harmony with the scriptures.  In 1623 he moved to London and became a member of the First Independent Church of London, in the Southwark part of London.  John became the second pastor of the Independent Church of London in 1624.

      A book on the genealogy of the early families in Barnstable, Massachusetts, tells of the beliefs and teachings of John Lothropp's group of Separatists in England:
           "They denounced Popery as the great harlot of Babylon; but they never denounced the doctrines of the church of England as anti-Christian, or asserted that the parish churches were not true churches, and that the members therof were not true Christians... they warred against the forms and ceremonies that the English Chruch had borrowed from Rome, against its Bishops and Archbishops, its prelatical rule, and claim to bind men's consciences.  They contended that the gospel should be preached in its purity, as it was in the apostolic times, before councils and synods and forged creeds, and that Christians should covenant with each other in the presence of Almighty God, to walk together in all God's ways and ordinances, according as He had already revealed, or should further make known into them, and to forsake all false ways; that man was not responisble to his fellow man in matters of conscience, but to God alone, and that the life is the evidence of faith, as the fruit is of the goodness of the tree."

      Meeting separate from the Church of England and believing such docftrine brought persecution from the government upon John Lothropp and his followers.  They met in various private homes at odd hours to avoid arrest and persecution.  One of the Reverend Lothropp's followers gives the following description of persecution he receeived from bishops of the Church of England, upon leaving one of their meetings:
           "In the heat of the bishop's severities were forced to meet very early in the morning and continue together until...    Meeting one Lord's day on Tower Hill, as I was coming out of the meeting, several rude fellows were about the door, and many stones were flung at me which did me no hurt."

      Another one of the Reverend Lothropp's followers, William Kifton, describes their meetings and persecution:  "I joined myself to an independent congregation, being about twenty-two years of age, with a resolution as soon as it pleased God to open a way to New England, but the Providence of God prevented me; and in a better time it pleased God to provide for me a suitable yokefellow who was with me in judgment and who was joined to the same congregation with me.  Being then in the heat of the Bishop's severities we were forced to meet very early in the morning and continue together till night, and amongst them, at their desire, I improved those small abilities God was pleased to give me, and although many times our meetings were disturbed yet I was kept out of the hands of the persecutor."

      The congregation was always under the threat of arrest, banishment, or death.  E. B. Huntington describes: "At that date the congregation of dissenters to which he ministered had no place of public worship, their worship itself being illegal.  Only such as could meet the obloquy and risk the danger of worshiping God in violation of human stature, were likely to be found in that secret gathering.  Yet in goodly numbers, in such places in Southwark as they could stealthily occupy, they held together and were comforted and instructed by the minister of their choice.  For not less than eight years they worshiped.  No threats of vengeance deterred, and no vigilance of officious ministers of the vilated law detected them.  More watchful grew the minions of [Bishop William] Laud.  Keen-scented Church houndes traversed all the narrow ways of the city whose most secret nooks could by any possibility admit even a small company of the outlaws".

      One of the main leaders against John Lothropp and the rest of the Puritans was William Laud, the Bishop of London at that time.  Bishop Laud became one of the most zealous attackers of the Puritans and their form of worship.  He did much to restore the Anglican Church to a more formal and strict form of worship.  He enforced a form of worship that was in strict accord with the Book of Common Prayer and other more ritualistic forms of worship.

      The Reverend John Lothropp and his followers met and avoided arrest for eight years.  On April 22, 1632, while John Lothropp and sixty of his Separatists met worshiping, John and forty-two of his congregation were arrested and put in prison.  Eighteen of the congregation escaped Bishop Laud's group of "ruffians."  While John Lothropp was in prison, Laud became the Archbishop of Canterbury.  (Although Laud was later arrested and beheaded for high treason).  The charge against the reverend and his followers was "Holding an illegal conventicle."  During John Lothropp's questioning in the High Commission Court, John told Bishp Laud that he was a minister.  Laud then asked, "How and by whom qualified?" John Lothropp responded pointedly in return, "I am a Minister of the gospel of Christ, and the Lord hath qualified me."

      John Lothropp and his followers were asked by the court to take an oath of allegiance to the Church of England and admit that they had participated in an "illegal conventicle: but they all refused.  One woman, Elizabeth Melborne, during her questioning explained why she would not take the oath: "I do not know any such thing as a Conventicle; we did meet to pray and talk of the word of God, which is according to the law of the land."  To this remark the Archbishop of York replied, "God will be served publicly, not in your private house."  Reading the account of the court records shows examples of the strong, brave women from Lothrop's congregation standing up to questioners.

      One woman, Sara Barbone, escaped the prison and seven or eight others had been let out of prison in error or by friendly jail keepers.  The jailers were then ordered by Bishop Laud to find the woman who had escaped and the ones let free and return them to the jail.

      While some of the imprisoned congregation were treated favorably by the guards, John Lothropp was not.  While John was confined "a fatal sickness was preying upon his wife, and bringing her fast toward her end."  John asked to visit his wife before her death and Bishop Laud let him if he promised to return.  John visited his wife and gave her a blessing.  When his wife, Hannah died, John returned to the prison.  This left John and Hannah's children helpless, with no one to care for them.

      In the spring of 1634, all the prisoners taken during the April 23, 1632 raid, with the exception of John Lothropp, were released from prison.  Life in the prison for John Lothropp must have been miserable.  A description of a prison at that time is recorded by a Jesuit priest, F. Laithwaite, held in prison on a similar charge as John Lothropp's:
           "Eighty men and women were huddled together in one filthy dungeon, where they were all chained by the feet to an iron ring in such a manner that they could only just change their position by sitting, standing or lying down.  They were eaten up by vermin, and surrounded by filth, which they had no means of removing, and the Jesuit's hands, feet and face were so much swollen that he could not sleep for pain, whilst the stench made food loathsome."

      Other descriptions of jails at that time describe terrible conditions.  One account describes how when a prisoner was removed from the courtroom to be returned to his prison in the dungeon, "a blast of fetid air from the dungeons beneath poisoned the Court, and infrected all who were present."  Six hundred people in the courtroom became ill that day and 510 and died within the next five weeks, including judges, magistrates and most of the jury.  Some rooms were described as being 12 feet square, holding fifty people.  (John was held in a jail called 'The Clink'  one of the worst in England.  It was so notorious that we still refer today someone going to jail as being thrown in the clink.)

      Finally, Bishop William Laud, now the Archbishop of Canterbury, softened his heart after hearing the pleadings of John Lothropp's children, ages twenty to eight.  John was released from jail on April 24, 1634 on the condition that he leave the courtry and never return.  It appears that John did not leave the country immediately.  He took time to reorganize his old congregation and settle a crisis over the form and age of baptism.  This became a serious threat to John being arrested again, since this was a violation of his parole.  In fact, a decree was issued for John Lothropp's arrest again but he was already on a boat heading for America where there was "a Church without a bishop and a State without a King."

      While crossing the Atlantic Ocean, John Lothropp was reading his Bible and fell asleep when a spark from his candle fell upon the open page and burned a hole through several leaves.  John patched the damaged pages and then, according to family tradition, supplied the missing texts from memory since no other Bible was accessible to him.  Today, that same Bible is on display in the Sturgis Library in Barnstable, Massachusetts.

      John arrived in Boston, Massachusetts on September 18, 1634, on the ship Griffin.  Thirty of John's original congregation in London immigrated to America with him.  They first settled at Scituate, Massachusetts, and then moved to Barnstable on Cape Cod.  John Lothropp established the West Parish Church in Barnstable, Massachusetts, which is the oldest standing Congregational Church in America.  Here John married his second wife, Ana.  Some of Lothropp's biographers think her last name was Hammond.

      "John Lothropp became a highly regarded religious and community leader in New England.  Many promineeent leaders in the United States and in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints claim him as their forebearer.  It is significant that Orson Pratt, in a letter to his brother Parley, stated, 'You will recollect that Joseph [Smith] had a vision and saw that our families and his all sprang from the same man a few generations ago.'"  (This was proved to be so)
      ****

      GRIFFIN. This ship arrived at Boston September (18), with about one hundred passengers and cattle for the plantations.
      Rev. JOHN LOTHROP from London (settled in) Scituate
      Mrs....... Lothrop
      Thomas Lothrop
      Samuel Lothrop
      Joseph Lothrop
      John Lothrop
      Benjamin Lothrop
      Jane Lothrop
      Barbara Lothrop
      WILLIAM HUTCHINSON of Alford, county Lincoln (settled in) Boston
      Mrs. Anne Hutchinson
      Edward Hutchinson
      Faith Hutchinson
      Bridget Hutchinson
      William Hutchinson
      Samuel Hutchinson
      Anne Hutchinson
      Mary Hutchinson
      Susanna Hutchinson
      Rev. ZACHARIAH SYMMES of Canterbury, county Kent (settled in) Charlestown
      Mrs. Sarah Symmes
      William Symmes
      Mary Symmes
      Elizabeth Symmes
      Huldah Symmes
      Hannah Symmes
      Rebecca Symmes
      WILLIAM BARTHOLOMEW (settled in) lpswich
      Mrs. Mary Bartholomew
      NATHANIEL HEATON of Alford, county Lincoln (settled in) Boston
      Mrs. Elizabeth Heaton
      Samuel Heaton
      Jabez Heaton
      Leah Heaton
      Mary Heaton
      THOMAS LYNDE of Dunstable, county Bedford (settled in) Charlestown
      Mrs. Margaret Lynde
      Thomas Lynde
      Henry Lynde
      WILLIAM HAINES of Dunstable, county Bedford (settled in) Salem
      RICHARD HAINES of Dunstable, county Bedford (settled in) Salem
      ****

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Huntington's Lo-Lathrop Family-American Ancestry pp 47-48. Rev John Lathrop or Lowthrop of Etton, Yorkshire, England was baptized 20 Dec 1584. He was educated at Queen's College Cambridge, BA in 1605, MA in 1609, He was vicar of Egerton, Kent, in 1611. He was pastor of the First Independant Church in London in 1623. Because of this he was imprisoned at Newgate on account of his non-conformity. In 1632 he imigrated to America and landed at Boston. He later settled at Scituate and then moved to Barnstable where he died 8 Nov 1653. He was descended from the Lowthropes or Low Thrope, East Riding, Yorkshire. The coat of arms of this well known family is found in Goris roll of Arms, also on a monument erected in the Granary Burying Ground Boston, to the memory of the brave Capt. Lathrop killed by the Indians in 1675. [18]

  • Reference  Bryan S. Larson. "Reverend John Lathrop". Our Family Histories. https://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/getperson.php?personID=I10107&tree=00 (accessed March 24, 2019).

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    9. [S108] Rice, Gareth (Main) Genealogical Society of Utah. (Added). "The Utah genealogical and historical magazine". (Salt Lake City, Utah : Geneal. Society of Utah, 1910-1940.); LC CALL NO.: F821.U89; FORMAT: Serial ;, 20:66-67.

    10. [S5] Fuller, Robert F., Gerald Ralph, Hortense M.. "Adamic Lineages of Horace Ralph Fuller Family". (Salem, Massachusetts : Peabody Essex Museum ; Mystic, Conn. : Mystic Seaport Museum, 1996); Call # 910.4 S796, Pedigree Records - Chart: 18-10; 48-4; 53-4.

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    12. [S181] Huntington, Elijah Baldwin, 1816-1877. (Main). "A genealogical memoir of the Lo-Lathrop family in this country embracing the descendants, as far as known, of the Rev. John Lothropp ...". (Ridgefield, Conn. : Julia M. Huntington, 1884); LC CALL NO.: Microfilm8655(C); FORMAT: Book [Microform] ; (Boston:MA, NEHGS, 1884), NEHGS #P3-32500, p. 41.

    13. [S182] Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Genealogies of Mayflower Families". (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1985), p. 519.

    14. [S183] Willison, George Findlay, 1897-. "--Saints and strangers, being the lives of the Pilgrim fathers & their families, with their friends & foes; & an account of their posthumous wanderings in limbo, their final resurrection & rise to glory, & the strange pilgrimages of Plymouth rock / George F. Willison.". (New York : Reynal & Hitchcock, [1945]);, p. 143, 316, 357, 380.

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    16. [S1402] Personal knowledge of Kirk Larson, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

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    23. [S5] Fuller, Robert F., Gerald Ralph, Hortense M.. "Adamic Lineages of Horace Ralph Fuller Family". (Salem, Massachusetts : Peabody Essex Museum ; Mystic, Conn. : Mystic Seaport Museum, 1996); Call # 910.4 S796, Pedigree Records - Chart: 18-20; 53-8.


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