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Dora Black

Dora Black[1]

Female 1905 - 1976  (70 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name Dora Black  [2
    Born 16 Aug 1905  Pacheco, Galeana, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Female 
    Census 1920  Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Physical Description Twin to Nora, Red Hair 
    Died 21 Jul 1976  Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Cause: Bone Cancer 
    Obituary of Dora Black Adams
    Dora Black Adams Funeral Program
    Buried 26 Jul 1976  Blanding City Cemetery, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Dora B. and Joseph W. Adams grave marker
    Person ID I217038  Full Tree | Boulter, Palmer, Timmins, Frint
    Last Modified 26 Jun 2014 

    Father David Patten Black
              b. 10 Feb 1874, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 20 Oct 1958, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Elzada Kartchner
              b. 25 Apr 1885, Colonia Díaz, , Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 5 Jun 1957, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 25 Nov 1900  Pacheco, Galeana, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4
    Family ID F87907  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Husband Joseph William Adams
              b. 23 May 1905, Bluff, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 27 Sep 1965, Cortez, Montezuma, Colorado, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Married 17 Apr 1928  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
    +1. Joyce Adams
              b. 13 Nov 1929, Moab, Grand, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 13 Mar 2012, Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     2. Joseph Conrad Adams
              b. 30 May 1931, Cortez, Montezuma, Colorado, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 16 Mar 1934, Moab, Grand, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     3. Larry Patten Adams
              b. 25 Oct 1932, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 25 Oct 1932, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +4. Living
     5. Ingrid Kaye Adams
              b. 21 Oct 1935, Cortez, Montezuma, Colorado, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 27 Aug 2001, Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    +6. Living
    +7. Living
    Last Modified 25 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F84458  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 16 Aug 1905 - Pacheco, Galeana, Chihuahua, México Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1920 - Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 17 Apr 1928 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Joyce Adams - 13 Nov 1929 - Moab, Grand, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Joseph Conrad Adams - 30 May 1931 - Cortez, Montezuma, Colorado, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Larry Patten Adams - 25 Oct 1932 - Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Ingrid Kaye Adams - 21 Oct 1935 - Cortez, Montezuma, Colorado, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Bone Cancer - 21 Jul 1976 - Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 26 Jul 1976 - Blanding City Cemetery, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Location Cemetery Hospital Town Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Photos
    Nora & Dora
    Dora Black in Candy Store
    Joe, Dora, William
    Dora Black  Sepia
    Dora Black
    Dora Black

  • Notes 
    • Twin to Nora BLACK
      From a tribute book made about David P. Black and his family by his children in 1978:
      Written by one of her children:
      Dora Black Adams, born August 16, 1905, in Pacheco, Mexico, was the third child, second of a set of twin girls, of David Patten and Elzada Kartchner Black.  Dora's formative years were spent in Blanding, Utah, where she attended school until necessity required that she accompany her father as cook for his road construction crew.  She was then sixteen years old.  She helped her father continuously until 1927, when at the age of twenty-three, she married Joseph William Adams.  Dora's family included three daughters, and four sons (two died as children) and a son of Joe's by a former marriage.  Dora gave freely of her time and talents to the church and to the community.  Dora maintained a home where all people, young and old, felt welcome.  All visitors to her home were offered something to eat.  She was a friend to all, her family, her friends, the community, and those down on their luck.  Anyone who came to her left with a need met and a happier heart.  When she did a favor she forgot it, but when she received a favor or a kindness she never forgot it.  Her ingenuity as an artist in the crafts was much recognized throughout the community and her advice was solicited by all looking for new ideas in creative living and decorating.
           Dora was a pioneer girl who was born in the backcountry during the age of the coal stove, the flat iron and the kerosene lamp.  She grew with the times into a gracious mother, a credit to her husband, her family, and her community.  She was a constant companion of her husband, who in the last years of his life, suffered ill health and her courage and equanimity were sorely tested in September of 1965 when she lost her beloved Joseph.  True to her character, she shouldered her grief with an understanding and acceptance that is native to the woman who has given much and asked for little.  She consoled her children and stood for them as a remarkable example of that which is noble in woman - love, wisdom, courage, and strength.
           Dora demonstrated unusual faith and courage when her husband Joe died.  She seemed to be more of a comfort for her children than we were for her.  Dora also demonstrated great faith when she continued to smile every day during her final illness.  She continued to live as a full person when she had death as a daily reality and endured a long and painful illness, (bone cancer) gracefully.  Dora's generous love for so many people is a true expression of faith.  It does reflect a love like Christ had for humanity.  She demonstrated faith by her continuous concern for everyone she met.

      A Tribute to Dora Black Adams
      (Twin sister to Nora Black Frint)
      By Rhoda Rogers (her sister)
           It is a great blessing to a family when a new baby arrives.  In Pacheco, Old Mexico on August 16, 1905 David and Elzada Kartchner Black's home was doubly blessed when two babies arrived.  Nora and Dora identical little twin girls with beautiful auburn colored red hair.
           A brother was there to welcome them when they were born and he died just a year ago this month.  Two more brothers came along before they had to leave Old Mexico during the revolution.
           They came to Blanding to live and here through the years Dora became the big sister to six younger sisters and what a beautiful, wonderful sister she was.  My earliest recollection of her and Nora was their gorgeous red hair.  It distinguished them and made them stand out in any crowd.
           During their early years their lives were almost synonymous.  They fooled family and friends, boy friends, teachers and could stand in for each other without anyone knowing the difference.
           When Dora was sixteen she went with her father, who was a road construction contractor, to cook for his road crews.  Through these experiences and a natural ability she became a marvelous cook.
           Several years later when she returned from helping her father in Taos, New Mexico, she met Joseph Adams, who all affectionately called Joe.  They soon married and went to Carlisle, to a little two-room house to live.  Joe said about Dora, "No matter where I needed to go she was at my side and soon made a house into a home."
           There were so many wonderful memories in those two little rooms.  I have wished many times that Joe's children could have heard him sing, as I did, many evenings there.
           Joyce was born while they lived here.  She was the second grandchild and the first granddaughter in the family.  How we adored her and what a talented lovely woman she grew to be.  Two more little boys were born while they lived there, but they died.  When Joyce was old enough for school they moved here to Monticello.  This became Dora's hometown.  You are the dear hearts and gentlepeople she learned to love and to serve.
           Dora's empty arms were soon filled with a precious welcomed little girl they named LaRee.  She inherited her mother's ambition and drive to accomplish and get things done.  Ingrid was next.  She was a beautiful baby with a clear, almost olive complexion that she has been lucky enough to keep.  She has her mother's ability to organize and see things from every side so that she can arrive at fair, good decisions.
           A son is always a delight, so when John was born I'm sure Dora could envision him doing all kinds of great deeds.  He did not disappoint her.  He is now Dr. Adams in a big San Antonio Texas college.
           The baby is always special, so when David was born he was adored and humored by all the family.  One of the highlights of Dora and Joe's life was when he got old enough to go on a mission.  Another crowning highlight was when they got a recommend to go to the temple, a short while before David was to return.  The thought crossed their mind that maybe they should wait for David, but Joe said, "No, we have already waited too long.  We'll go again when he comes home."  They were married in the Manti temple.  This changed their lives in many ways and brought them a peace of mind and happiness they didn't realize they were missing.
           By this time Lynn had come to make his home with them.  He was a considerate son that she could turn to with any frustrating problem.  She loved you and your family, Lynn, and often expressed her appreciation of you to me.
           Dora and Joe had a good life together.  They had a great capacity for enjoying things.  So they danced together, they entertained together.  Their home and heart and arms were always open to friends old and young.  To family, whether one at a time or a whole gang for reunions.  They served on committees together, canned fruit together and raised crops and sheep and other livestock together.  Their love and affection for each other grew.  Dora used to worry about her freckles and Joe would say, "Mama, I love every freckle."
           When her beloved Joe had a heart attack and left her so suddenly, she accepted it with grace and dignity and the will of the Lord and comforted us when her own heart was breaking.  At a time like this, when a woman's life is so changed, they have to change something.  So Dora set about to change her home into the beautiful place it is today.  She could walk through a room and pick up something here or there or place something and the room seemed warmer and neater for her passing through it.  She always had something interesting to make, or a recipe to share so it was fun to visit her or have her come to visit.
           Love is shown or proved by good works and prayers are answered by our willingness to do good works.  We can only contemplate the many prayers that must have been answered through Dora, because here was a life of service and good works.  She never made a trip to Salt Lake that she didn't have errands to run for someone, or the Relief Society, or a club, or someone's wedding decorations.  She did it pleasantly and carefully as though that was part of the reason for coming.
           She was a friend to all; her family, her friends, the community, the Indians, and those down on their luck.  Anyone who came to her left with a need met and a happier heart.  When she did a favor she forgot it, but when she received a favor or a kindness she never forgot it.
            She didn't talk about others or gossip, but she had time for your problems.  You wouldn't know two little expressions could say so much until you listened to her end of a conversation.  You have heard her say, "Uh-huh, uh-huh" and "Oh, oh."  I can't imitate it but I can hear it and her pleasant laugh, in my minds eye, anytime I stop to listen.
           One of her little grandchildren always called her grandora.  I thought, "What could be a better truer name for her than Grand Dora."  Another highlight in her life happened right here in this chapel when she had a grandson and two great-grandsons, all blessed and named the same day.  Blessed by their fathers who honored their priesthood.  It is hard to know you are going to die and won't be around to see all your precious grandchildren grow up.
           She had to help make a success of the Festival of Arts before she could tend to her own illness that was nagging at her.  When she came to Salt Lake the doctor told her she had a month to live.  She could have held up under that ultimatum, but I think the Lord knew we couldn't.  He let her stay to bless our lives a little longer, so that her children could serve her and profit by the great example of courage and steadfastness she set, so that she could prove herself by valiantly enduring through tribulation to the end. 
           I think Dora had the faith to be healed.  I think there are some among you who had the faith to heal her, but we must say to our all wise Father in heaven, "Thy will be done."  If mortality were the perfect state, death would be a frustration.  But death is an awakening to eternal life.  Someday, somewhere, we'll understand.
           In a little over a years time her body went from a beautiful, alert, ambitious, gracious, smiling, lovely woman to a wasted, frail, little old lady, but her spirit has grown large enough to fill our hearts and lives with hope and faith and expectation until we meet again.
           Her children do not need to be commended for the gentle, loving, constant care they gave her while they had to play the heart breaking waiting game at her bedside.  Serving her was their reward.  It was not a burden for them and I think Dora came to realize this.  They will always look back and realize what a blessing this was in their lives and as they look forward they knew we never forget our mother.  There is always the child in each of us crying for its mother.
           And so we each weep for her family, who must carry on without her wise counsel and companionship.  We weep for Nora who has lost something as precious as part of herself.  We weep for you her dear, dear friends, who have been such an important part of her life.  And we weep for ourselves because we have lost a beloved and irreplaceable friend. 
           The more of our loved ones we have in heaven the more like home heaven becomes.  So Dora has come home.  We say goodbye, in Joyce's words: to a revered wife a valued citizen, and an honored mother.  In our hearts we say "Good bye, Grand Dora.  We love you."  In the name of Jesus Christ, amen. [2]

  • Reference  Bryan S. Larson. "Dora Black". Our Family Histories. https://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/getperson.php?personID=I217038&tree=00 (accessed June 25, 2019).

  • Sources 
    1. [S1535] Personal knowledge of Clark Timmins, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    2. [S2891] Personal knowledge of Marla Kirby, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    3. [S2903] Latter Day Saint Family History Microfilm.

    4. [S2904] Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records, Source number: 246.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Cod.


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